Focus on Wasabi: 500 Friends

logo-b7111c366789e0cebe7b8e897ab16cad500friends is the trusted provider of next generation loyalty solutions to more than 40 of the IR 1,000 retail brands. With LoyaltyPlus Recapture, Amplify, Enterprise, and Omni-Channel they are helping brands retain, engage, understand and connect with their customers.

logo_paintWasabi Ventures is a venture capital and incubation firm that specializes in building and advising early stage technology companies.  TestSoup is thrilled to be a part of WV and loves the opportunity to promote other portfolio companies with the weekly “Focus on Wasabi”!  Check back again next week for another great company!

For more info about TestSoup, click here.

How Smart Are Ya? – Accuplacer

AccuplacerFind Sec(x)

a) 4/5

b) 5/4

c) 3/4

d) 4/3

e) 3/5

For answer – click here

For more information on the TestSoup study aids for this test – click here

 

How Smart Are Ya? – Common Core 6th Grade Math

CC3Which expression is the simplified version of the expression (3u5)2?
 A.      3u7
 B.      6u10
 C.      9u7
 D.     9u10
For answer - click here
For more information on the TestSoup study aids for this test - click here

 

Focus on Wasabi: funsherpa

logofunsherpa makes giving amazing gifts easy. 1) Choose an experience. Shop from hundreds of experiences all over the country. 2) Give the experience. 3) They redeem at their convenience. Recipients get to book the experience – instructions are provided along with the gift voucher.

logo_paintWasabi Ventures is a venture capital and incubation firm that specializes in building and advising early stage technology companies.  TestSoup is thrilled to be a part of WV and loves the opportunity to promote other portfolio companies with the weekly “Focus on Wasabi”!  Check back again next week for another great company!

For more info about TestSoup, click here.

How Smart Are Ya? – Air Force PDG-NCO

AF NCO T/F.  By 1939, the air branch had moved to modern multiengine heavy bombers capable of carrying large crews on flights for thousands of miles.

 

 

 

For answer – click here

For more information on the TestSoup study aids for this test – click here

 

Integrating Common Core Into Your Day-to-Day Routine

High School StudentsThe Common Core standards, in essence, are asking teachers to incorporate more in-depth questioning and encourage more critical thinking. This means we have to teach our students how to think critically. They’ll not only need to see and hear other people do it on a regular basis, but they’ll need to practice it on their own. A lot. Encouraging our kids to ask questions and think their way through the answers on a daily basis will help to build those critical thinking skills. Here are some simple, yet powerful, ways to challenge students to think critically both in the classroom and at home.

How do we incorporate critical thinking in the classroom?

When I first started integrating the Common Core Standards into my 6th grade reading class, I had to figure out a few things. How was I going to adjust my day-to-day plans without completely redoing everything? How was I going to challenge all my students, on many different levels, to think critically about what we were doing together as a class?

The answer turned out to be in the questions.  Many of the Common Core Standards are challenging our students to determine the answer to a question and then SUPPORT or EXPLAIN it. Turns out, I could add a few of these higher-order thinking questions into my presentations, materials, exit tickets, and class discussions. This way, I could take what I had already made and add an extra level of thinking that Common Core encouraged. It was a change from the strict, aligned material I had used in the past, and it took me a little while to figure out exactly what I wanted from my students in terms of expectations of answers, etc. We worked through the changes together as a team, which ended up being what made the difference. My students eventually started asking the tough questions; they asked me, themselves, and each other. They helped each other during discussions and worked through what they were trying to figure out or say.

The more we talked, the easier it became. I could start to see a major difference in the level of thinking that was going on in terms of what students were talking about. The more they talked to one another and asked each other questions, the more their understanding grew. This was not only true of my reading class, but also of math classes in our school as well. The students worked together in groups and talked about the best way to go about solving the challenging problems in front of them. The teacher gave them a series of questions to ask each other while they were working to make sure they were on track and that they actually understood what they were doing (rather than just plugging numbers into formulas and equations).

How do we reinforce higher-order thinking and critical thinking at home?

Encouraging critical thinking at home can be easier than you think. When you and your kid(s) are having a conversation about something, you can “secretly” insert these types of questions into the conversation. Developing critical thinking skills isn’t always about whether or not they get the “right” answer, it’s the fact that they are really digging into the “why” behind the question. For example, if you asked your child why they thought the fire truck’s siren sounded louder today than yesterday, they might give you an answer such as “It was a different truck with a louder horn.” You can then ask them other questions that will lead them to thinking their way to the correct answer, which may be that you were inside the house yesterday and you were outside today. It’s the process of them thinking their way through the situation that really makes the difference in the long run.

If you’re working on homework with them, ask them to explain their answers to you. You can use the question stems below as a guide. Not only will you help them really work to understand what they are doing, but you’ll learn a lot about what they’re doing in school too!

Critical Thinking Questions to get you started:

Remember: Kids have a way of talking themselves through things. Critical thinking coaching has a lot to do with the questions you’re asking, not the answers you’re giving. Let them talk J Add in your own thoughts afterwards and talk about how they’re similar or different. Even if it wasn’t the answer you were expecting, pay close attention to what made them arrive at their answer. Lots of times, it makes sense! The most important thing? Just get them talking!

Why….?

What were you (they) thinking when…?

How do you know / What supports this/ What tells you that you’re correct….?

Were you right or wrong in your initial thoughts…?

What other knowledge can you use to help you…?

We’d love to hear more of your favorite questions to get the critical thinking going in your classrooms and at home! Comment here on our blog, on our Facebook page, or Tweet at us! If you have any ideas, suggestions, or questions, you can email me at laura@testsoup.com. I’d love to hear from you! Let’s work together as teachers, parents, and students to push our students to success with the Common Core Standards!

 

How Smart Are Ya? – Wonderlic

Wonderlic

 Which number does not belong?

8, 12, 2, 48, 90, 22, 324, 202, 17, 18, 28, 6

 

 

For answer – click here

For more information on the TestSoup study aids for this test – click here

 

How Smart Are Ya? – Certified Meeting Professional

Certified Meeting

To calculate the Average Daily Rate or ADR at a hotel, which formula would you use?

a) The total sleeping room revenue in a given period divided by the number of rooms occupied.

b) The number of rooms occupied multiplied by the number of occupants.

c) The number of rooms reserved minus the actual number of rooms occupied.

d) The normal daily price of a room multiplied by the number of days minus ten percent.

For answer – click here

For more information on the TestSoup study aids for this test – click here

 

TestSoup Personal – Online – OnDemand Tutoring – Beta

TS_logoWe, at TS, are excited to launch our newest effort.  Most of our employees are current or past tutors and we realized that we could offer a low cost / high value tutoring option.   Using our current products with user and admin interface, we can provide unique feedback during your studying process for a variety of subjects.

 

TestSoup Tutoring offers:

- Professional tutor with experience in the area of study
- Tutorial support when you need it
- One-on-One attention
- Personalized, custom study plan
- Extra practice problems not available in Flashcards or eBooks
- Tutoring for the following subjects / tests:

- Common Core 6th Grade Math – test page - tutoring page
- Wonderlic Cognative Ability Test – test page  – tutoring page
- Accuplacer – test page - tutoring page
- Compass – test pagetutoring page
- SAT – test pagetutoring page
- ACT – test page - tutoring page
- PSAT – test pagetutoring page

All you need to get started is the free version of Skype so we can be available to you.   Be the first to experience the future of tutoring at our beta test discount prices.  Click here to find out more.

 

TestSoup Releases First In A Series Of Common Core Study Guides

TestSoup’s Guide to the Common Core: 6th Grade Math

CC3The Common Core Standards are the new set of national standards that are being rolled out in a majority of states in the U.S. this year. The students in the states who are participating in the Common Core will be taking the first Common Core Assessment starting next school year. The Common Core Standards have been designed to better prepare students for college and their careers.

Access the 6th Grade Common Core Flashcards

The first thing you’ll notice about Common Core, is that they seem to require a bit more work from students. Although this seems a little scary, it’s actually because students are going to be developing stronger critical thinking skills in the process. This will set them up for greater success as they progress through school and into their adult life. What makes this a little less scary is that we can all work together to help students build and practice those critical thinking skills.

Last week, TestSoup launched its first round of our high-quality Common Core Resources. Our 6th Grade Math for the Common Core flashcards are now available for students, parents, and teachers! As part of our launch, we gifted over 400 flashcard sets to 6th graders in low-income schools across the Mississippi Delta and New Orleans. We are committed to making sure all students have access to our materials as they transition into the Common Core Standards!

Here, on TestSoup’s Common Core blog, we will be providing you with resources to help you best support students, no matter what you role is. We encourage you to comment here or ask questions so that we can all begin to have these important conversations about Common Core to further our understanding of what it is and develop the best strategies for how to support your student at school and at home. Follow us on FaceBook, Google+ and Twitter too!

amazon android-google-playaccess-online